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Viewing cable 09PARIS933, FRANCE OPEN TO EXAMINING SIX NEW GUANTANAMO

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Reference ID Created Released Classification Origin
09PARIS933 2009-07-09 16:04 2010-11-30 16:04 CONFIDENTIAL//NOFORN Embassy Paris
VZCZCXRO9875
PP RUEHAG RUEHROV RUEHSL RUEHSR
DE RUEHFR #0933/01 1901613
ZNY CCCCC ZZH
P 091613Z JUL 09
FM AMEMBASSY PARIS
TO RUEHC/SECSTATE WASHDC PRIORITY 6674
INFO RUCNMEM/EU MEMBER STATES COLLECTIVE PRIORITY
C O N F I D E N T I A L SECTION 01 OF 02 PARIS 000933 

NOFORN 
SIPDIS 

E.O. 12958: DECL: 07/07/2019 
TAGS: PREL PGOV PHUM PTER FR
SUBJECT: FRANCE OPEN TO EXAMINING SIX NEW GUANTANAMO 
DETAINEE FILES 

PARIS 00000933 001.2 OF 002 


Classified By: Classified by Pol M/C Allegrone for Reasons 1.4 b and d. 

1. (C/NF) Summary: In a July 2 meeting with Eric 
Chevallier, Special Advisor to the Foreign Affairs Minister, 
Ambassador Dan Fried, Special Envoy for Closure of the 
Guantanamo Detention Facility (S/GC), summarized the results 
of his efforts to negotiate the resettlement of Guantanamo 
detainees and thanked France for agreeing to consider six new 
detainee files. Chevallier stressed that France would review 
the cases in a positive light. Speaking on instruction, he 
also said that France would not be able to respond until more 
is known about the attitude of Congress toward accepting 
detainees on U.S. soil. Chevallier agreed that a favorable 
decision allowing the resettlement of Guantanamo detainees in 
the United States is not a "pre-condition" but characterized 
it as extremely important and not far from being a 
pre-condition. He also noted that establishing a good 
precedent with Schengen members by providing France with 
information to share on the previously transferred detainee 
Boumediene would likely assist the process for obtaining 
Schengen visas in other detainee resettlements in Europe. 

2. (SBU) Chevallier was joined by Deputy Director of the 
Foreign Minister's Office, Michele Boccoz; MFA Deputy 
Director for the Office of Transnational Threats, Martin 
Julliard; MFA Assistant secretary-equivalent for 
International Organizations, Sylvie Bermann; Deputy Assistant 
secretary-equivalent for Human Rights, Jacques Pellet; Deputy 
Director for the North Americas Office, Bernard 
Regnauld-Fabre; and External Relations for the European Union 
desk officer, Fatih Akcal. Charge Pekala, Pol/Min Counselor 
and note taker also attended. End Summary. 

Six New Detainee Files: Potential Impact of U.S. Decisions 
--------------------------------------------- ------------- 

3. (C/NF) S/E Fried introduced the dossiers of six 
detainees that the U.S. would like France to consider taking, 
pointing out that several of them have court-ordered releases 
and noting that we have presented some of the cases to other 
European governments. Chevallier expressed appreciation for 
the new information and assured Fried that, following the 
Obama-Sarkozy meeting in June and the resettlement in May of 
Algerian Lakdar Boumediene, France will look at the files in 
a positive light. However, speaking on instruction, he 
cautioned that France will not be able to provide an answer 
until more is known about the attitude of Congress toward 
accepting some of the detainees on U.S. soil. A positive 
decision by Congress, Chevallier continued, would boost the 
prospects for selling detainee resettlement to the French 
public and to other European countries. When pressed by 
Fried, Chevallier responded that the congressional decision 
is not a "pre-condition," but also said "it is not far from 
that." He emphasized that the U.S. decision "is part of 
France,s political assessment" and "is extremely important" 
to France,s final decision. At the same time, Chevallier 
confirmed that France would not intervene negatively in U.S. 
discussions with other countries, for example, Spain, Italy, 
and Portugal, that are moving ahead with resettlement. In 
closing discussions on the files,Fried suggested French 
officials visit Guantanamo to interview the detainees and 
talk to the defense lawyers to inform their decision and aid 
in the selection of future candidates and to make any 
requests for further information through intelligence liaison. 

Request to Share Boumediene's File with Schengen Partners 
--------------------------------------------- ------------ 

4. (C/NF) Chevallier confirmed that Schengen partner states 
now have to share the files of detainees with their Schengen 
partners per the agreed EU framework. If no state opposes, a 
Schengen visa will be issued; however, if one or more partner 
states oppose, then only a national visa can be granted. 
Refusal to grant a Schengen visa would also have an impact on 
the social services and type of residence status offered to 
former detainees. Chevallier would like Boumediene to be the 
first test case, as he is a lower risk detainee. Fried 
agreed to provide a revised file that can be shared with EU 
partners. Chevallier regretted the EU decision to put this 
issue under the purview of Interior Ministers, saying it 
would have been easier to manage under Foreign Ministers. 
Fried concluded his discussion with 
Chevallier by noting that U.S. procedures in detainee 
transfers have changed somewhat. New congressional 
legislation now requires notification of transfer 15 days in 
advance and notification of the transfer arrangements. The 
U.S. plans to meet this requirement in the future through an 
exchange of diplomatic notes. 

5. (C/NF) Chevallier,s expert on this issue, Martin 
Julliard, asked about the financial payments the U.S. is 

PARIS 00000933 002.2 OF 002 


providing to Bermuda and Palau upon their acceptance of the 
Uighur detainees. Fried clarified that U.S. funds are 
intended to cover reimbursable expenses only and are minimal. 
Julliard said that his office has been monitoring French 
public opinion on the resettlement of Boumediene and cited 
the use of tax money for detainee resettlement as one of the 
top three concerns. Fried made no commitment, but 
said he would be willing to discuss this further if it 
becomes necessary symbolically for France. 

6. (C/NF) Comment: French authorities remain proud of their 
lead role in opening the way to resettlement of some 
detainees in Europe and are committed to looking favorably at 
the six new detainee files. However, a U.S. decision to 
accept or reject taking detainees on U.S. soil is clearly 
part of the calculation as they also assess French domestic 
reaction to resettlement. 

PEKALA